PublicationsInsights on Current Policy Issues

  • March 7, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak

    On February 24, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order entitled “Enforcing the Regulatory Reform Agenda”. The Executive Order establishes mechanisms intended to reduce regulations, including by implementing the President’s January 30, 2017 Executive Order which calls for agencies to eliminate two regulations for each new regulation they promulgate. Among the requirements of this latest Executive Order are mandates for federal agencies to appoint “Regulatory Reform Officers” and establish “Regulatory Reform Task Forces”. As described in a White House press release, the Executive Order directs each agency’s Regulatory Reform Task Force to: “evaluate existing regulations and identify candidates for repeal or modification”; and “focus on eliminating costly and unnecessary regulations.”

     

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  • February 9, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak

    On January 30, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order entitled “Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs”. The Executive Order is intended to ensure that “for every one new regulation issued, at least two prior regulations be identified for elimination”. On February 3, the White House issued a memorandum titled “Interim Guidance Implementing Section 2 of the Executive Order of January 30, 2017…” The memorandum provides agencies with information on how to implement the “Regulatory Cap for Fiscal Year 2017” established by the Executive Order.   

    Among the issues addressed, the February 3, memorandum clarifies that the Executive Order applies only to significant rulemakings, and does not require compliance by independent federal agencies such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

     

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  • January 25, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak 

    On January 24, President Trump signed an executive order and four memoranda addressing pipeline, infrastructure, and manufacturing issues. The memoranda include one directing prompt consideration of the remaining federal approvals needed by the Dakota Access Pipeline. Another memorandum invites TransCanada to resubmit its application for a Presidential border-crossing permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline. The memorandum further directs the Department of State to “reach a final permitting decision” within 60 days of receiving a new Keystone XL permit application.

    A memorandum to the Secretary of Commerce requires the development of a “plan” to require “all new pipelines, as well as retrofitted, repaired, or expanded pipelines [to]…use materials and equipment [including steel] produced in the United States, to the maximum extent possible and to the extent permitted by law…”

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President

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George Olsen joined Williams & Jensen as an associate in June of 1975. He became a principal in January of 1978 and was elected President of the firm in 2004. For nearly 35 years, Mr. Olsen's primary concentration has been health law, representing pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, health insurance and managed care organizations, hospitals and other health care providers, as well as businesses affected by federal health care law. He also handles antitrust, education, and administrative law issues. Mr. Olsen was selected as one of Washington's top lobbyists by The Hill.

Professional background

Mr. Olsen has expertise in legislation, regulations, and policy matters in the health care sector. He has been involved with virtually every major health care legislative initiative over the last three decades including the Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act of 1988; the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996; the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997; the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003; the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; and the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act. In addition, Mr. Olsen has represented clients in the rulemaking processes resulting from these laws. He also assists businesses and organizations in anticipating and responding to new laws, federal rules, and policy developments.

Mr. Olsen's practice includes representing clients under Congressional investigation including a Member of Congress, hospitals and insurers, pharmaceutical companies, and manufacturing companies.

In the antitrust field, Mr. Olsen has defended companies in lawsuits and investigations alleging various forms of anti-competitive and deceptive conduct, was involved in the early development of the Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission Statements of Antitrust Enforcement Policy in Health Care, and has worked on various antitrust legislation initiatives.

In the education field, Mr. Olsen has counseled accreditation organizations and higher education loan programs on a variety of legislative, regulatory, corporate, and litigation matters.
Mr. Olsen currently holds an "AV" rating from Martindale-Hubbell (Very high to preeminent legal ability, very high ethical standards). He is a member of the National Health Lawyers Association, the American Bar Association, and the Bar Association of the District of Columbia.

Education

  • St. Anselm College, B.A., magna cum laude, 1972
  • George Washington University Law School, J.D., with Honors 1975

Bar Admissions

  • District of Columbia

Court Admissions

  • U.S. Supreme Court
  • Numerous Federal district and appellate courts

PublicationsInsights on Current Policy Issues

  • March 7, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak

    On February 24, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order entitled “Enforcing the Regulatory Reform Agenda”. The Executive Order establishes mechanisms intended to reduce regulations, including by implementing the President’s January 30, 2017 Executive Order which calls for agencies to eliminate two regulations for each new regulation they promulgate. Among the requirements of this latest Executive Order are mandates for federal agencies to appoint “Regulatory Reform Officers” and establish “Regulatory Reform Task Forces”. As described in a White House press release, the Executive Order directs each agency’s Regulatory Reform Task Force to: “evaluate existing regulations and identify candidates for repeal or modification”; and “focus on eliminating costly and unnecessary regulations.”

     

    Read...

    Read More
  • February 9, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak

    On January 30, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order entitled “Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs”. The Executive Order is intended to ensure that “for every one new regulation issued, at least two prior regulations be identified for elimination”. On February 3, the White House issued a memorandum titled “Interim Guidance Implementing Section 2 of the Executive Order of January 30, 2017…” The memorandum provides agencies with information on how to implement the “Regulatory Cap for Fiscal Year 2017” established by the Executive Order.   

    Among the issues addressed, the February 3, memorandum clarifies that the Executive Order applies only to significant rulemakings, and does not require compliance by independent federal agencies such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

     

    Read...

    Read More
  • January 25, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak 

    On January 24, President Trump signed an executive order and four memoranda addressing pipeline, infrastructure, and manufacturing issues. The memoranda include one directing prompt consideration of the remaining federal approvals needed by the Dakota Access Pipeline. Another memorandum invites TransCanada to resubmit its application for a Presidential border-crossing permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline. The memorandum further directs the Department of State to “reach a final permitting decision” within 60 days of receiving a new Keystone XL permit application.

    A memorandum to the Secretary of Commerce requires the development of a “plan” to require “all new pipelines, as well as retrofitted, repaired, or expanded pipelines [to]…use materials and equipment [including steel] produced in the United States, to the maximum extent possible and to the extent permitted by law…”

    Read...

    Read More

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