PublicationsInsights on Current Policy Issues

  • February 9, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak

    On January 30, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order entitled “Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs”. The Executive Order is intended to ensure that “for every one new regulation issued, at least two prior regulations be identified for elimination”. On February 3, the White House issued a memorandum titled “Interim Guidance Implementing Section 2 of the Executive Order of January 30, 2017…” The memorandum provides agencies with information on how to implement the “Regulatory Cap for Fiscal Year 2017” established by the Executive Order.   

    Among the issues addressed, the February 3, memorandum clarifies that the Executive Order applies only to significant rulemakings, and does not require compliance by independent federal agencies such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

     

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  • January 25, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak 

    On January 24, President Trump signed an executive order and four memoranda addressing pipeline, infrastructure, and manufacturing issues. The memoranda include one directing prompt consideration of the remaining federal approvals needed by the Dakota Access Pipeline. Another memorandum invites TransCanada to resubmit its application for a Presidential border-crossing permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline. The memorandum further directs the Department of State to “reach a final permitting decision” within 60 days of receiving a new Keystone XL permit application.

    A memorandum to the Secretary of Commerce requires the development of a “plan” to require “all new pipelines, as well as retrofitted, repaired, or expanded pipelines [to]…use materials and equipment [including steel] produced in the United States, to the maximum extent possible and to the extent permitted by law…”

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  • November 18, 2016
    By Nicole Ruzinski and Frank Vlossak 

    Presidential transitions in which one party takes over from the other can trigger regulatory activity in both the outgoing and incoming administrations, designed to further each president’s policy priorities. An outgoing president may attempt to finalize a number of regulations before leaving office. The incoming president can be left with the responsibility of implementing policies that are not aligned with the new administration’s agenda. An incoming president faces significant challenges in rescinding regulations that were adopted and finalized before the end of the prior administration. The new administration has more leeway in delaying or repealing regulations that are not final or effective by Inauguration Day. An incoming administration and aligned House and Senate majorities can also utilize the expedited processes under the Congressional Review Act to rescind regulations that were promulgated late in the outgoing administration. 

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Over four decades of law & lobbying experience

Williams & Jensen was co-founded in 1970 by J. D. Williams, one of the most respected tax and business lobbyists in Washington, and the late Robert Jensen, known for his antitrust, securities, and litigation experience. In many ways, the firm's success continues the dual approach set at its beginning: highly effective government relations, grounded in technically proficient law.

Williams & Jensen has since grown to become one of the few leading independent law firms in Washington with a practice focused primarily on lobbying. On a daily basis, we help companies and organizations in the U.S. and around the world influence legislation and public policy process in Washington. The firm's record of winning in Washington has attracted a clientele of leading companies, trade associations, and institutions, many relying on the firm's services for more than three decades.

Firm Members

Williams & Jensen is made up of people who combine impressive government experience with rare technical expertise. Many have been with the firm twenty or thirty years. Others represent new voices attracted by the firm's independence, premier practice, and reputation for results. Almost all have come from high level service with various Administrations, Congressional and Senate leaders, and critical departments and agencies. While many important political ties were forged from our professionals' earlier government experience, the firm has cultivated and continually strengthened new relationships -- across branches of government, parties, and changes in leadership. The people of Williams & Jensen know the decision-makers, understand their political histories and current positions, and are able to work shifting alliances and priorities to benefit client positions.

Equally important is Williams & Jensen's depth of expertise in a wide range of practice areas. We recognize that legislation and policy decisions on taxation, health care, intellectual property, and other issues can impact an organization's vitality as profoundly as decisions related to its core activities. Our professionals offer substantive expertise across all these areas. We understand the technical considerations behind the full breadth of laws and regulations affecting clients, and have experience in marrying government policy goals with client needs.

Team Approach

Because no issue exists in a vacuum, Williams & Jensen tackles problems as a multi-specialty team. We efficiently combine our diverse abilities, insights, and relationships built over 30 years to identify opportunities for clients and forestall threats. One Williams & Jensen professional may take the lead, but clients get the benefit of our pooled strengths. Ideas and results -- far more than hierarchy or headliners -- matter.

Typically, our team identifies and analyzes a client's issues and develops options for action. Among the components that may make up the plan are coalition development, comments on legislation, compliance filings, litigation and settlement negotiations, strategic interaction with decision-makers, and (through a wholly owned affiliate) grassroots campaigns. Some plan components can only be provided by a law firm such as ours; all are more effective for the unique way we combine lobbying and legal firepower. Williams & Jensen then goes beyond developing strategies to implementing them and delivering results -- that is to say, doing what our clients appreciate most: winning in Washington. 

PublicationsInsights on Current Policy Issues

  • February 9, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak

    On January 30, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order entitled “Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs”. The Executive Order is intended to ensure that “for every one new regulation issued, at least two prior regulations be identified for elimination”. On February 3, the White House issued a memorandum titled “Interim Guidance Implementing Section 2 of the Executive Order of January 30, 2017…” The memorandum provides agencies with information on how to implement the “Regulatory Cap for Fiscal Year 2017” established by the Executive Order.   

    Among the issues addressed, the February 3, memorandum clarifies that the Executive Order applies only to significant rulemakings, and does not require compliance by independent federal agencies such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

     

    Read...

    Read More
  • January 25, 2017

    By Frank Vlossak 

    On January 24, President Trump signed an executive order and four memoranda addressing pipeline, infrastructure, and manufacturing issues. The memoranda include one directing prompt consideration of the remaining federal approvals needed by the Dakota Access Pipeline. Another memorandum invites TransCanada to resubmit its application for a Presidential border-crossing permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline. The memorandum further directs the Department of State to “reach a final permitting decision” within 60 days of receiving a new Keystone XL permit application.

    A memorandum to the Secretary of Commerce requires the development of a “plan” to require “all new pipelines, as well as retrofitted, repaired, or expanded pipelines [to]…use materials and equipment [including steel] produced in the United States, to the maximum extent possible and to the extent permitted by law…”

    Read...

    Read More
  • November 18, 2016
    By Nicole Ruzinski and Frank Vlossak 

    Presidential transitions in which one party takes over from the other can trigger regulatory activity in both the outgoing and incoming administrations, designed to further each president’s policy priorities. An outgoing president may attempt to finalize a number of regulations before leaving office. The incoming president can be left with the responsibility of implementing policies that are not aligned with the new administration’s agenda. An incoming president faces significant challenges in rescinding regulations that were adopted and finalized before the end of the prior administration. The new administration has more leeway in delaying or repealing regulations that are not final or effective by Inauguration Day. An incoming administration and aligned House and Senate majorities can also utilize the expedited processes under the Congressional Review Act to rescind regulations that were promulgated late in the outgoing administration. 

    Read...

    Read More

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